Biology: The Dynamic Science (MindTap Course List) - 4th Edition - by Peter J. Russell, Paul E. Hertz, Beverly McMillan - ISBN 9781305389892
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Biology: The Dynamic Science (MindTap C...
4th Edition
Peter J. Russell, Paul E. Hertz, Beverly McMillan
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305389892

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Chapter 2.5 - Water Ionization And Acids, Bases, And BuffersChapter 3 - Biological Molecules: The Carbon Compounds Of LifeChapter 3.1 - Formation And Modification Of Biological MoleculesChapter 3.2 - CarbohydratesChapter 3.3 - LipidsChapter 3.4 - ProteinsChapter 3.5 - Nucleotides And Nucleic AcidsChapter 4 - CellsChapter 4.1 - Basic Features Of Cell Structure And FunctionChapter 4.2 - Prokaryotic CellsChapter 4.3 - Eukaryotic CellsChapter 4.4 - Specialized Structures Of Plant CellsChapter 4.5 - The Animal Cell SurfaceChapter 5 - Membranes And TransportChapter 5.1 - Membrane Structure And FunctionChapter 5.2 - Functions Of Membranes In Transport: Passive TransportChapter 5.3 - Passive Water Transport And OsmosisChapter 5.4 - Active TransportChapter 5.5 - Exocytosis And EndocytosisChapter 6 - Energy, Enzymes, And Biological ReactionsChapter 6.1 - Energy, Life, And The Laws Of ThermodynamicsChapter 6.2 - Free Energy And Spontaneous ReactionsChapter 6.3 - Adenosine Triphosphate (atp): The Energy Currency Of The CellChapter 6.4 - Role Of Enzymes In Biological ReactionsChapter 6.5 - Conditions And Factors That Affect Enzyme ActivityChapter 6.6 - Rna-based Biological Catalysts: RibozymesChapter 7 - Cellular Respiration: Harvesting Chemical EnergyChapter 7.1 - Overview Of Cellular RespirationChapter 7.2 - Glycolysis: Splitting The Sugar In HalfChapter 7.3 - Pyruvate Oxidation And The Citric Acid CycleChapter 7.4 - Oxidative Phosphorylation: The Electron Transfer System And ChemiosmosisChapter 7.5 - Anaerobic Respiration And FermentationChapter 7.6 - Interrelationships Of Catabolic And Anabolic PathwaysChapter 8 - PhotosynthesisChapter 8.1 - Photosynthesis: An OverviewChapter 8.2 - The Light-dependent Reactions Of PhotosynthesisChapter 8.3 - The Light-independent Reactions Of PhotosynthesisChapter 8.4 - Photorespiration And Alternative Processes Of Carbon 180 FixationChapter 8.5 - Photosynthesis And Cellular Respiration ComparedChapter 9 - Cell CommunicationChapter 9.1 - Cell Communication: An OverviewChapter 9.2 - Cell Communication Systems With Surface ReceptorsChapter 9.3 - Signaling Pathways Triggered By Surface ReceptorsChapter 9.4 - Signaling Pathways Triggered By Internal ReceptorsChapter 9.5 - Integration Of Cell Communication PathwaysChapter 10 - Cell Division And MitosisChapter 10.1 - The Cycle Of Cell Growth And Division: An OverviewChapter 10.2 - The Mitotic Cell CycleChapter 10.3 - Formation And Action Of The Mitotic SpindleChapter 10.4 - Cell Cycle RegulationChapter 10.5 - Cell Division In BacteriaChapter 11 - Meiosis: The Cellular Basis Of Sexual ReproductionChapter 11.1 - The Mechanisms Of MeiosisChapter 11.2 - Mechanisms That Generate Genetic VariabilityChapter 11.3 - The Time And Place Of Meiosis In Organismal Life CyclesChapter 12 - Mendel, Genes, And InheritanceChapter 12.1 - The Beginnings Of Genetics: Mendel’s Garden PeasChapter 12.2 - Later Modifications And Additions To Mendel’s PrinciplesChapter 13 - Genes, Chromosomes, And Human GeneticsChapter 13.1 - Genetic Linkage And RecombinationChapter 13.2 - Sex-linked GenesChapter 13.3 - Chromosomal Mutations That Affect InheritanceChapter 13.4 - Human Genetic Traits, Pedigree Analysis, And Genetic CounselingChapter 13.5 - Non-mendelian Patterns Of InheritanceChapter 14 - Dna Structure And ReplicationChapter 14.1 - Establishing Dna As The Hereditary MoleculeChapter 14.2 - Dna StructureChapter 14.3 - Dna ReplicationChapter 14.4 - Repair Of Errors In DnaChapter 15 - From Dna To ProteinChapter 15.1 - The Connection Between Dna, Rna, And ProteinChapter 15.2 - Transcription: Dna-directed Rna SynthesisChapter 15.3 - Production Of Mrnas In EukaryotesChapter 15.4 - Translation: Mrna-directed Polypeptide SynthesisChapter 15.5 - Genetic Changes That Affect Protein Structure And FunctionChapter 16 - Regulation Of Gene ExpressionChapter 16.1 - Regulation Of Gene Expression In ProkaryotesChapter 16.2 - Regulation Of Transcription In EukaryotesChapter 16.3 - Posttranscriptional, Translational, And Posttranslational RegulationChapter 16.4 - Genetic And Molecular Regulation Of DevelopmentChapter 16.5 - The Genetics And Genomics Of CancerChapter 17 - Bacterial And Viral GeneticsChapter 17.1 - Gene Transfer And Genetic Recombination In BacteriaChapter 17.2 - Viruses And Viral GeneticsChapter 17.3 - Viroids And Prions, Infectious Agents Lacking Protein CoatsChapter 18 - Dna Technologies: Making And Using Genetically Altered Organisms, And Other ApplicationsChapter 18.1 - Key Dna Technologies For Making Genetically Altered OrganismsChapter 18.2 - Applications Of Genetically Altered OrganismsChapter 18.3 - Other Applications Of Dna TechnologiesChapter 19 - Genomes And ProteomesChapter 19.1 - Genomics: An OverviewChapter 19.2 - Genome Sequence Determination And AnnotationChapter 19.3 - Determining The Functions Of The Genes In A GenomeChapter 19.4 - Genome EvolutionChapter 20 - Development Of Evolutionary ThinkingChapter 20.1 - Recognition Of Evolutionary ChangeChapter 20.2 - Darwin’s JourneysChapter 20.3 - Evolutionary Biology Since DarwinChapter 21 - Microevolution: Genetic Changes Within PopulationsChapter 21.1 - Variation In Natural PopulationsChapter 21.2 - Population GeneticsChapter 21.3 - The Agents Of MicroevolutionChapter 21.4 - Maintaining Genetic And Phenotypic VariationChapter 21.5 - Adaptation And Evolutionary ConstraintsChapter 22 - SpeciationChapter 22.1 - What Is A Species?Chapter 22.2 - Maintaining Reproductive IsolationChapter 22.3 - The Geography Of SpeciationChapter 22.4 - Genetic Mechanisms Of SpeciationChapter 23 - Paleobiology And MacroevolutionChapter 23.1 - The Fossil RecordChapter 23.2 - Earth HistoryChapter 23.3 - Historical Biogeography And Convergent BiotasChapter 23.4 - The History Of BiodiversityChapter 23.5 - Interpreting Evolutionary LineagesChapter 23.6 - The Evolution Of Morphological NoveltiesChapter 24 - Systematics And Phylogenetics: Revealing The Tree Of LifeChapter 24.1 - Nomenclature And ClassificationChapter 24.2 - Phylogenetic TreesChapter 24.3 - Sources Of Data For Phylogenetic AnalysesChapter 24.4 - Traditional Classification And Paraphyletic GroupsChapter 24.5 - The Cladistic RevolutionChapter 24.6 - Phylogenetic Trees As Research ToolsChapter 24.7 - Molecular Phylogenetic AnalysesChapter 25 - The Origin Of LifeChapter 25.1 - The Formation Of Molecules Necessary For LifeChapter 25.2 - The Origin Of CellsChapter 25.3 - The Origins Of Eukaryotic CellsChapter 26 - Prokaryotes: Bacteria And ArchaeaChapter 26.1 - Prokaryotic Structure And FunctionChapter 26.2 - The Domain BacteriaChapter 26.3 - The Domain ArchaeaChapter 27 - ProtistsChapter 27.1 - What Is A Protist?Chapter 27.2 - The Protist GroupsChapter 28 - Seedless PlantsChapter 28.1 - Plant Evolution: Adaptations To Life On LandChapter 28.2 - Bryophytes, The Nonvascular Land PlantsChapter 28.3 - Seedless Vascular PlantsChapter 28.4 - Ecological, Economic, And Research Importance Of Seedless PlantsChapter 29 - Seed PlantsChapter 29.1 - The Rise Of Seed PlantsChapter 29.2 - Gymnosperms: The “naked Seed” PlantsChapter 29.3 - Angiosperms: Flowering PlantsChapter 29.4 - Insights From Plant Genome ResearchChapter 29.5 - Seed Plants And PeopleChapter 30 - FungiChapter 30.1 - General Characteristics Of FungiChapter 30.2 - Evolution Of The Kingdom FungiChapter 30.3 - Fungal Associations: Lichens And MycorrhizaeChapter 30.4 - Impacts Of Fungi In Ecosystems And SocietyChapter 31 - Animal Phylogeny, Acoelomates, And ProtostomesChapter 31.1 - What Is An Animal?Chapter 31.2 - Key Innovations In Animal EvolutionChapter 31.3 - An Overview Of Animal Phylogeny And ClassificationChapter 31.4 - Animals Without Tissues: ParazoaChapter 31.5 - Eumetazoans With Radial SymmetryChapter 31.6 - Lophotrochozoan ProtostomesChapter 31.7 - Ecdysozoan ProtostomesChapter 32 - Deuterostomes: Vertebrates And Their Closest RelativesChapter 32.1 - Invertebrate DeuterostomesChapter 32.2 - Overview Of The Phylum ChordataChapter 32.3 - The Origin And Diversification Of VertebratesChapter 32.4 - “agnathans”: Hagfishes And Lampreys, Conodonts And OstracodermsChapter 32.5 - Gnathostomata: The Evolution Of JawsChapter 32.6 - Tetrapoda: The Evolution Of LimbsChapter 32.7 - Amniota: The Evolution Of Fully Terrestrial VertebratesChapter 32.8 - Living Lepidosaurs: Sphenodontids And SquamatesChapter 32.9 - Living Archelosaurs: Turtles, Corocodilians, And BirdsChapter 32.10 - Mammalia: Monotremes, Marsupials, And PlacentalsChapter 32.11 - Nonhuman PrimatesChapter 32.12 - The Evolution Of HumansChapter 33 - The Plant BodyChapter 33.1 - Basic Concepts Of Plant Structure And GrowthChapter 33.2 - The Three Plant Tissue SystemsChapter 33.3 - Root SystemsChapter 33.4 - Primary Shoot SystemsChapter 33.5 - Secondary GrowthChapter 34 - Transport In PlantsChapter 34.1 - Overview Of Water And Solute Movements In PlantsChapter 34.2 - Roots: Moving Water And Minerals Into The PlantChapter 34.3 - Transport Of Water And Minerals In The XylemChapter 34.4 - Stomata: Regulating The Loss Of Water By TranspirationChapter 34.5 - Transport Of Organic Substances In The PhloemChapter 35 - Plant NutritionChapter 35.1 - Plant Nutritional RequirementsChapter 35.2 - SoilChapter 35.3 - Root Adaptations For Obtaining And Absorbing NutrientsChapter 36 - Reproduction And Development In Flowering PlantsChapter 36.1 - Overview Of Flowering Plant ReproductionChapter 36.2 - The Formation Of Flowers And GametesChapter 36.3 - Pollination, Fertilization, And GerminationChapter 36.4 - Asexual Reproduction Of Flowering PlantsChapter 36.5 - Early Plant DevelopmentChapter 37 - Plant Signals And Responses To The EnvironmentChapter 37.1 - Introduction To Plant HormonesChapter 37.2 - Plant Chemical DefensesChapter 37.3 - Plant MovementsChapter 37.4 - Plant Biological ClocksChapter 38 - Introduction To Animal Organization And PhysiologyChapter 38.1 - Organization Of The Animal BodyChapter 38.2 - Animal TissuesChapter 38.3 - Coordination Of Tissues In Organs And Organ SystemsChapter 38.4 - HomeostasisChapter 39 - Information Flow And The NeuronChapter 39.1 - Neurons And Their Organization In Nervous SystemsChapter 39.2 - Signaling By NeuronsChapter 39.3 - Transmission Across Chemical SynapsesChapter 39.4 - Integration Of Incoming Signals By NeuronsChapter 40 - Nervous SystemsChapter 40.1 - Invertebrate And Vertebrate Nervous Systems ComparedChapter 40.2 - The Peripheral Nervous SystemChapter 40.3 - The Central Nervous System And Its FunctionsChapter 40.4 - Memory, Learning, And ConsciousnessChapter 41 - Sensory SystemsChapter 41.1 - Overview Of Sensory Receptors And PathwaysChapter 41.2 - Mechanoreceptors And The Tactile And Spatial SensesChapter 41.3 - Mechanoreceptors And HearingChapter 41.4 - Photoreceptors And VisionChapter 41.5 - ChemoreceptorsChapter 41.6 - Thermoreceptors And NociceptorsChapter 41.7 - Magnetoreceptors And ElectroreceptorsChapter 42 - The Endocrine SystemChapter 42.1 - Hormones And Their SecretionChapter 42.2 - Mechanisms Of Hormone ActionChapter 42.3 - The Hypothalamus And PituitaryChapter 42.4 - Other Major Endocrine Glands Of VertebratesChapter 42.5 - Endocrine Systems In InvertebratesChapter 43 - Muscles, Bones, And Body MovementsChapter 43.1 - Vertebrate Skeletal Muscle: Structure And FunctionChapter 43.2 - Skeletal SystemsChapter 43.3 - Vertebrate Movement: The Interactions Between Muscles And BonesChapter 44 - The Circulatory SystemChapter 44.1 - Animal Circulatory Systems: An IntroductionChapter 44.2 - Blood And Its ComponentsChapter 44.3 - The HeartChapter 44.4 - Blood Vessels Of The Circulatory SystemChapter 44.5 - Maintaining Blood Flow And PressureChapter 44.6 - The Lymphatic SystemChapter 45 - Defenses Against DiseaseChapter 45.1 - Three Lines Of Defense Against PathogensChapter 45.2 - Innate Immunity: Nonspecific DefensesChapter 45.3 - Adaptive Immunity: Specific DefensesChapter 45.4 - Malfunctions And Failures Of The Immune SystemChapter 45.5 - Evolved Defenses Against Pathogens In Other AnimalsChapter 46 - Gas Exchange: The Respiratory SystemChapter 46.1 - The Function Of Gas ExchangeChapter 46.2 - Evolutionary Adaptations For RespirationChapter 46.3 - The Mammalian Respiratory SystemChapter 46.4 - Mechanisms Of Gas Exchange And TransportChapter 46.5 - Respiration At High Altitudes And In Ocean DepthsChapter 47 - Animal NutritionChapter 47.1 - Feeding And NutritionChapter 47.2 - Digestive ProcessesChapter 47.3 - Digestion In Humans And Other MammalsChapter 47.4 - Regulation Of The Digestive ProcessChapter 47.5 - Digestive Specializations In VertebratesChapter 48 - Regulating The Internal EnvironmentChapter 48.1 - Introduction To Osmoregulation And ExcretionChapter 48.2 - Osmoregulation And Excretion In InvertebratesChapter 48.3 - Osmoregulation And Excretion In MammalsChapter 48.4 - Regulation Of Mammalian Kidney FunctionChapter 48.5 - Kidney Function In Nonmammalian VertebratesChapter 48.6 - Introduction To ThermoregulationChapter 48.7 - EctothermyChapter 48.8 - EndothermyChapter 49 - Animal ReproductionChapter 49.1 - Animal Reproductive Modes: Asexual And Sexual ReproductionChapter 49.2 - Cellular Mechanisms Of Sexual ReproductionChapter 49.3 - Sexual Reproduction In HumansChapter 49.4 - Methods For Preventing Pregnancy: ContraceptionChapter 50 - Animal DevelopmentChapter 50.1 - Mechanisms Of Embryonic DevelopmentChapter 50.2 - Major Patterns Of Cleavage And GastrulationChapter 50.3 - From Gastrulation To Adult Body Structures: OrganogenesisChapter 50.4 - Embryonic Development Of Humans And Other MammalsChapter 50.5 - The Cellular Basis Of DevelopmentChapter 51 - Ecology And The BiosphereChapter 51.1 - The Science Of EcologyChapter 51.2 - Environmental Diversity Of The BiosphereChapter 51.3 - Organismal Responses To Environmental Variation And Climate ChangeChapter 51.4 - Terrestrial BiomesChapter 51.5 - Freshwater EnvironmentsChapter 51.6 - Marine EnvironmentsChapter 52 - Population EcologyChapter 52.1 - Population CharacteristicsChapter 52.2 - DemographyChapter 52.3 - The Evolution Of Life HistoriesChapter 52.4 - Models Of Population GrowthChapter 52.5 - Population DynamicsChapter 52.6 - Human Population GrowthChapter 53 - Population Interactions And Community EcologyChapter 53.1 - Population InteractionsChapter 53.2 - The Nature Of Ecological CommunitiesChapter 53.3 - Community CharacteristicsChapter 53.4 - Effects Of Population Interactions Of Community CharacteristicsChapter 53.5 - Effects Of Disturbance On Community CharacteristicsChapter 53.6 - Ecological Succession: Responses To DisturbanceChapter 53.7 - Variations In Species Richness Among CommunitiesChapter 54 - Ecosystems And Global ChangeChapter 54.1 - Modeling Ecosystem ProcessesChapter 54.2 - Energy Flow And Ecosystem EnergeticsChapter 54.3 - Nutrient Cycling In EcosystemsChapter 54.4 - Human Activities And Anthropogenic Global ChangeChapter 55 - Biodiversity And Conservation BiologyChapter 55.1 - The Biodiversity Crisis On Land, In The Sea, And In River SystemsChapter 55.2 - Specific Threats To BiodiversityChapter 55.3 - Ecosystem Services That Biodiversity ProvidesChapter 55.4 - Which Species And Ecosystems Are Most Threatened By Human Activities?Chapter 55.5 - Conservation Biology: Principles And TheoryChapter 55.6 - Conservation Biology: Practical Strategies And Economic ToolsChapter 56 - Animal BehaviorChapter 56.1 - Instinctive And Learned BehaviorsChapter 56.2 - Neurophysiological And Endocrine Control Of BehaviorChapter 56.3 - Migration And WayfindingChapter 56.4 - Habitat Selection And TerritorialityChapter 56.5 - The Evolution Of CommunicationChapter 56.6 - The Evolution Of Reproductive Behavior And Mating SystemsChapter 56.7 - The Evolution Of Social Behavior

Book Details

Russell/Hertz/McMillan, BIOLOGY: THE DYNAMIC SCIENCE 4e teach Biology the way scientists practice it by emphasizing and applying science as a process. You learn not only what scientists know, but how they know it, and what they still need to learn. The authors explain complex ideas clearly and describe how biologists collect and interpret evidence to test hypotheses about the living world. Throughout, They provide engaging applications, develop quantitative analysis and mathematical reasoning skills, and build conceptual understanding.

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During the cell cycle, the DNA mass of a cell: Decreases during G1. Decreases during metaphase....The chromosome constitution number of this individual is 2=6. This drawing represents: a. mitotic...The dominant C allele of a gene that controls color in corn produces kernels with color; plants...In humans, redgreen color blindness is an X-linked recessive trait. If a man with normal vision and...Working on the Amazon River, a biologist isolated DNA from two unknown organisms, P and Q. He...Eukaryotic mRNA: usessnRNPs to cut out introns and seal together translatableexons. uses a...The control of the delivery of finished mRNAs to the cytoplasm is an example of: a. translational...When studying the differences in the genes of bacteria, researchers: a. do not grow bacteria on a...The point at which a restriction enzyme cuts DNA is determined by: a. the sequence of nucleotides....Why is the Solexa/Illumina DNA sequencing method faster and less expensive than the Sanger method?...The father of taxonomy is: Charles Darwin. Charles Lyell. Alfred Wallace. Carolus Linnaeus. Jean...The reason spontaneous mutations do not have an immediate effect on allele frequencies in a large...The biological species concept defines species on the basis of: reproductive characteristics....The fossil record: a. provides direct and indirect evidence about life in the past. b. shoes that...The evolutionary history of a group of organisms is called its: a. classification. b. taxonomy. c....Earth was formed ___ years ago, whereas the oldest known living cell formed about ___ years ago. a....A urologist identifies cells in a mans urethra as bacterial. Which of the following descriptions...Which of the following is a characteristic of protists that is also found in at least one other...Which of the following is not an evolutionary trend among plants? a. developing vascular tissues b....Which of the following was not a reproductive innovation associated with the evolution of the seed?...Which of the following statements does not reflect current under- standing of phylogenetic...Which of the following characteristics is not typical of most animals? a. heterotrophic b. sessile...Which phylum includes animals that have a water vascular system? a. Echinodermata b. Hemichordata c....With respect to growth, plants differ from animals in that: a. plant growth involves only an...Short-distance transport mechanisms in plants: a. move water and dissolved materials by osmosis. b....Which statement best applies to plant micronutrients? a. They typically are not available in loams....In an angiosperm life cycle, sexual reproduction includes: meiosis within the male gametophyte to...Which of the following plant hormones does not stimulate cell division? a. auxins b. cytokinins c....Which tissue type consisting of sheetlike layers of cells can both exchange oxygen and act as a...Nerve signals travel in the following manner: A dendrite of a sensory neuron receives the signal;...Ganglia first became enlarged and fused into a lobed brain in the evolution of: a. vertebrates. b....An ambulance siren in close proximity to a dog can cause the dog to howl in pain. Which receptors...Amine hormones are usually: hydrophilic when secreted by the thyroid gland. based on tyrosine....Vertebrate skeletal muscle: is attached to bone by means of ligaments. may bend but not extend body...Compared with vertebrates, most invertebrates: a. lead more mobile lives. b. require a higher level...Which of the following most accurately describes mammal defenses against disease-causing viruses or...Which of the following describes a respiratory medium? a. the liver of an amphibian, in which the...Required molecules that animals cannot synthesize are called: a. nutrients. b. essential nutrients....Which of the following statements about osmoregulation is true? a. In freshwater invertebrates,...Asexual reproduction is most successful in: a. changing environments. b. sessile animals. c. densely...Major contributors to the cleavage patterns of a zygote are the: a. sperm and egg cytoplasm. b....The lithosphere includes all: oceans. ice caps. rocks, soils, and sediments. gases and airborne...Ecologists sometimes use mathematical models to: a. avoid conducting laboratory studies or field...According to optimal foraging theory, predators: a. always feed on the largest prey possible. b....Which of the following events would move energy and material from a detritivore into a higher...The greatest extinction in the history of life on Earth: a. occurred at the end of the Permian...Marler concluded that white-crowned sparrows can learn their species song only: a. after receiving...

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